Derek Walman – Discount Garage Doors, Inc.

Q. Is my garage door hurricane ready?

A. In Florida, all new garage doors must be wind-load rated, which means they can withstand a specified wind and miles per hour rating set by individual counties in Florida. If you want to know if your garage is wind-load rated, then search for a wind-load sticker on the garage door. The sticker will tell you what wind speed the door is rated for. 

Some garage doors are impact rated. That means the garage door was tested by having a 2×4 piece of wood shot at it at 50 feet per second, and the door did not have holes larger than three inches in diameter and remained operable. 

Older garage doors are not wind-load rated. I tell customers that if their garage door is older than 1994 and they’re worried about hurricanes to just buy a new one. Unfortunately, with older garage doors the panels get pulled out of the house, which rips the door out of the garage. Then wind enters and pushes the roof off from underneath. If you lose your garage you’re going to lose your roof. 

 

Q. What’s the best way to secure my garage door while I’m on vacation?

A. There are two things I recommend. First, close the garage door from the inside and unplug the garage door opener unit. By doing this, you will eliminate 95 percent of possible problems, and someone with a universal remote will not be able to open it. Second, take your remote control out of the car or golf cart. People can easily break in and steal it to open your house. I recommend getting a remote that will fit on your key chain. That way the remote is always with you. 

 

Q. What are some things a homeowner can do to maintenance his or her garage door?

A.  First, do not store any pool chemicals in the garage. Pool chemicals cause the garage door and its parts to rust, which interferes with function of the garage door. Second, don’t use the garage door as a front door. The parts of a garage door—including the springs, bearings, rollers, and cables—all have a cycle life. The garage door going up and down is one cycle. When you constantly use the garage door, the parts start breaking down. Third, I would spray the door every three months with a lubricant specifically designed for a garage door. By spraying the springs, hinges, and tracks, you’ll double the life on your door parts. Finally, I would check the balance of your garage door because doing so can extend the life of your door and help you avoid expensive repair bills. 

 

Q. How long do garage doors last?

A. It really depends on the homeowner. A well-maintained garage door can last 40 years and still function efficiently. Conversely, I’ve seen some garage doors that are five years old and already need to be replaced. Homeowners need to be diligent and keep up with maintenance. 

352.205.4799 // www.dgdoors.com // 15580 S US Hwy 441 Unit 8, Summerfield, FL 34491

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